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Grossly Inaccurate Depiction of Sport Psychology


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#1 M3sportpsych

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 01:54 AM

As an actual qualified Sport Psychology Consultant with a private practice, i'm really disappointed in the writers and producers of the show for their terrible portrayal of sport psychology. The character is not competent in sport psychology, lacked professionalism and had remedial ethics at best. I understand the show wants to make it interesting by adding drama, but this was just so wrong. A professional would not be practicing (in any area of psychology) if they were going through such severe personal problems. And the number one question Mental health professionals should ask themselves is what is in the best interest of the client. She was so self-serving and really didn't give a crap or even ask about the clients needs. She didn't bother building rapport and actually caused her client harm. Again I know this is a tv show and is suppose to be entertaining, I just don't want people thinking that this is how sport psychology works.

The one positive is that it tested my own ethics as a professional as I cringed at all of the ethical violations and errors made. I'm very passionate about my field and if you want to learn more about what sport psychology is really about check out www.appliedsportpsych.org

#2 VerenFV

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 03:47 AM

Have to agree that the portrayal of the profession was amateurish, and was in the way of the show being enjoyable.

Tried to watch this show with a couple friends and their wives, and it was difficult as her character was so unrealistic in relation to her job. As our friend Cathy said "Is she a successful therapist or not? Can they make up their mind? If she's so brilliant, where are her clients or office? For someone who keeps acting so self-righteous about everything, she sure doesn't have any room to talk about how anybody else is running their life."

The ladies were also angry about the fact that USA has put on yet another show with a female lead who can't get their personal life normalized. Fairly Legal, this show, In Plain Sight, all have female leads who are "great at their job" by show publicizing or as stated by other characters in the shows, who are completely overmatched by life outside the job. It's as if the writers are telling women "Well, you can work, or you can date, be in love and find personal happiness." It's another less then stellar debut for USA, along with the "half dozen plotlines telegraphed and unlikely/unbelievable" from Suits, which make Royal Pains look like the Wire in comparison.

#3 sportdr

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 09:19 PM

I am an academician and a certified sport sport psychology consultant in private practice. To say I am disappointed is putting it mildly. To say I am angry is an understatement, as well. As one of the newer branches in the field of psychology, it has taken years for sport psychology to develop the credibility to be accepted by coaches and athletes alike. This series has taken all our hard work and distorted not only what we do, but also how we do it. Ethics have been thrown aside. The results of that final throw, and the context in which it was achieved are questionable, at best. When I first saw the commercials for the show, I was concerned for the field. Now that my concern has been realized (and then some!), I have completely skipped damage control and gone into crisis management mode.

As a field, we now have to put out the fires you set with your inaccuracies. You might have (at least) considered actually checking out what we do. It wouldn't have been difficult. You can Google sport psychology and bam! You'll find one of our affiliated professional organizations. And holy cow!! You'll find out what we actually do! Wow...research...what a concept!

Then maybe you could have done athletes and coaches a favor and actually used an expert consultant on the set! It's been done before. MASH had a military trauma doctor on staff for just this reason. Oh, wait. That never would have worked. You would have had to re-write most of the "drama." We can't sacrifice truth for drama!


I suppose the inaccuracies and lack of ethics are reflections of the screenwriters and their desire to create a sensationalistic, audience grabber. The writers blew it. It was was poorly researched, mind numbing sensationalism, and poorly scripted, to boot. That was a wasted hour of my life, and I can't get it back. As a network, you blew it for putting this trash out there. You chose to pander to the lascivious viewer, and misrepresent an ethical, honorable profession. You should be ashamed of your low standards.

#4 M3sportpsych

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 11:47 AM

I am an academician and a certified sport sport psychology consultant in private practice. To say I am disappointed is putting it mildly. To say I am angry is an understatement, as well. As one of the newer branches in the field of psychology, it has taken years for sport psychology to develop the credibility to be accepted by coaches and athletes alike. This series has taken all our hard work and distorted not only what we do, but also how we do it. Ethics have been thrown aside. The results of that final throw, and the context in which it was achieved are questionable, at best. When I first saw the commercials for the show, I was concerned for the field. Now that my concern has been realized (and then some!), I have completely skipped damage control and gone into crisis management mode.

As a field, we now have to put out the fires you set with your inaccuracies. You might have (at least) considered actually checking out what we do. It wouldn't have been difficult. You can Google sport psychology and bam! You'll find one of our affiliated professional organizations. And holy cow!! You'll find out what we actually do! Wow...research...what a concept!

Then maybe you could have done athletes and coaches a favor and actually used an expert consultant on the set! It's been done before. MASH had a military trauma doctor on staff for just this reason. Oh, wait. That never would have worked. You would have had to re-write most of the "drama." We can't sacrifice truth for drama!


I suppose the inaccuracies and lack of ethics are reflections of the screenwriters and their desire to create a sensationalistic, audience grabber. The writers blew it. It was was poorly researched, mind numbing sensationalism, and poorly scripted, to boot. That was a wasted hour of my life, and I can't get it back. As a network, you blew it for putting this trash out there. You chose to pander to the lascivious viewer, and misrepresent an ethical, honorable profession. You should be ashamed of your low standards.


well put!




#5 ScottBabb

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Posted 02 July 2011 - 03:43 PM

I guess it's a good thing that the show pretty clearly states that she is NOT a sports psychologist. The even went so far as to talk about how the team was coming to her AFTER they tried a sports psychologist from Harvard who had quit after only three sessions.

A PhD in psychology doesn't make someone a sports psychologist. It also doesn't make some a hypnotherapist. She refers to herself at various times as a "licensed therapist" and a "licensed hypnotherapist." The latter title doesn't exist in most (all?) states, so the show took some artistic license there. Her main mode of treatment appears to be hypnosis. They don't portray hypnotherapy completely accurately, but they do a far, far better job than I've seen on any other show.

As a hypnotherapist, she does commit a few ethical breaches, but none that are egregious. The one that really bothered me was trying to fool her weight/carb addiction client by setting the clock ahead 10 minutes.

I'm also surprised that some people seem to have missed the whole part of the show where Dani and her friend were trying to get her more clients because she needed more clients to survive financially. You can be brilliant (though I'd consider her an average hypnotherapist) and still not have a lot of clients. And many psychologists, therapists, and hypnotists have offices in their homes. And why would anyone think that someone needs to have a perfect life in order to advise others? Have you ever seen doctors or nurses who smoke? Have you ever seen fat coaches leading elite athletes to championships?

Why are ladies upset that USA is portraying women in rough situations as having the backbone to struggle through those situations without running to a doctor for the latest cocktail of happy pills? She discovered that her husband was cheating with multiple women, threw him out of the house, filed for a divorce, had to deal with a ton of crap from him (including him kicking her hard emotionally in the men's room scene), is trying to make enough money to support her family, and she's dealing with rebellious adolescent kids. That's normal life, and very little of it can be reasonably seen as "her fault." Would it make for a better show if she popped pills that made her not care that her world was a mess?

I don't know what research the show did into hypnosis, or if they have a consultant on staff to keep the hypnosis as technically accurate as possible, but I am happy to see that, while not great, they've done a far better job of portraying it than any other show I've seen. I like "The Mentalist," but I cringe every time he does anything that's supposed to involve hypnosis or neuro-linguistic programming. I'm a board-certified hypnotist, and I've been hypnotizing people since the 1970's. I'm good enough at what I do that other hypnotists refer their really hard clients to me. My approach to sports performance improvement hypnosis is completely different from what they showed her doing, but what she did would probably result in at least a little improvement.

If you perceive a need to do damage control or crisis management to protect the field of sports psychology against the crushing onslaught of people who have been confused by "Necessary Roughness," all you have to do is say: "She's not a sports psychologist. Didn't you catch where they said that in the show?"

Marketing advice: Plugging your web site in forum posts is considered taboo in some forums and accepted in others. It's almost never cool to do it as your first post to a forum. If you do plug a web site in forum posts (which can be an effective way to get traffic), then you should definitely have an actual web site at the URL, and not the generic "congratulations on signing up with us. This is where you will build your web site" page from a hosting company.

#6 ScottBabb

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 12:09 AM

Marketing advice: Plugging your web site in forum posts is considered taboo in some forums and accepted in others. It's almost never cool to do it as your first post to a forum. If you do plug a web site in forum posts (which can be an effective way to get traffic), then you should definitely have an actual web site at the URL, and not the generic "congratulations on signing up with us. This is where you will build your web site" page from a hosting company.


I checked the URL again just now, and I see a full (and professional-looking) web site there now. That's better.

#7 SimpleSins

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 01:07 AM

Maybe they will eventually devote more attention to it, but I was most disturbed about the privacy violations that abound with the home office. If I were a psychologist who practiced about of my home, I would be horrified if I saw the practice displayed in this light. One goes to a therapist with a presumption of privacy, and if people believe that the therapist's family or even the next appointment is sitting in the next room listening to every word....well, I think it would inhibit the development of a good patient-doctor rapport.

As far as single parent/family struggles, what I find most offensive is the show's implication that a woman's career should be dictated by an obnoxious teenage daughter. According to this show, had the daughter not granted her approval, the mother would have to go back to the man who has been cheating on her and thinks of her as a mutt, and give up her own career, even though doing that for the last 17 years doesn't seem to have helped with the character of the children through their formative years up to this point.

#8 M3sportpsych

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 03:34 AM

I guess it's a good thing that the show pretty clearly states that she is NOT a sports psychologist. The even went so far as to talk about how the team was coming to her AFTER they tried a sports psychologist from Harvard who had quit after only three sessions.

A PhD in psychology doesn't make someone a sports psychologist. It also doesn't make some a hypnotherapist. She refers to herself at various times as a "licensed therapist" and a "licensed hypnotherapist." The latter title doesn't exist in most (all?) states, so the show took some artistic license there. Her main mode of treatment appears to be hypnosis. They don't portray hypnotherapy completely accurately, but they do a far, far better job than I've seen on any other show.

As a hypnotherapist, she does commit a few ethical breaches, but none that are egregious. The one that really bothered me was trying to fool her weight/carb addiction client by setting the clock ahead 10 minutes.

I'm also surprised that some people seem to have missed the whole part of the show where Dani and her friend were trying to get her more clients because she needed more clients to survive financially. You can be brilliant (though I'd consider her an average hypnotherapist) and still not have a lot of clients. And many psychologists, therapists, and hypnotists have offices in their homes. And why would anyone think that someone needs to have a perfect life in order to advise others? Have you ever seen doctors or nurses who smoke? Have you ever seen fat coaches leading elite athletes to championships?

Why are ladies upset that USA is portraying women in rough situations as having the backbone to struggle through those situations without running to a doctor for the latest cocktail of happy pills? She discovered that her husband was cheating with multiple women, threw him out of the house, filed for a divorce, had to deal with a ton of crap from him (including him kicking her hard emotionally in the men's room scene), is trying to make enough money to support her family, and she's dealing with rebellious adolescent kids. That's normal life, and very little of it can be reasonably seen as "her fault." Would it make for a better show if she popped pills that made her not care that her world was a mess?

I don't know what research the show did into hypnosis, or if they have a consultant on staff to keep the hypnosis as technically accurate as possible, but I am happy to see that, while not great, they've done a far better job of portraying it than any other show I've seen. I like "The Mentalist," but I cringe every time he does anything that's supposed to involve hypnosis or neuro-linguistic programming. I'm a board-certified hypnotist, and I've been hypnotizing people since the 1970's. I'm good enough at what I do that other hypnotists refer their really hard clients to me. My approach to sports performance improvement hypnosis is completely different from what they showed her doing, but what she did would probably result in at least a little improvement.

If you perceive a need to do damage control or crisis management to protect the field of sports psychology against the crushing onslaught of people who have been confused by "Necessary Roughness," all you have to do is say: "She's not a sports psychologist. Didn't you catch where they said that in the show?"

Marketing advice: Plugging your web site in forum posts is considered taboo in some forums and accepted in others. It's almost never cool to do it as your first post to a forum. If you do plug a web site in forum posts (which can be an effective way to get traffic), then you should definitely have an actual web site at the URL, and not the generic "congratulations on signing up with us. This is where you will build your web site" page from a hosting company.



Yes, it is very true that a PhD does not make a sport psychologist or a hypnotherapist, which is why the ethical issue of competence is so very important. Surely in your 40+ years of experience you must have encountered a variety of unqualified people trying to do your job. It happens in most every field. I want general public to know that Sport Psychology is a legitimate field based in research and this show is not an example of the awesome field of sport psychology. Our training in how to assess the performance issue and the interventions used to address the performance issue is specialized. For some sport psychologists who are trained in hypnotherapy may choose it as an intervention. I would not personally go that route as I do not have the competence. My exposure has been limited to hypnotherapy and the research around it. I would love to learn more about it so that in the future i can assess if hypnotherapy might be the best course of action for a client and furthermore learn what competencies I should look for in a referral.

Having a home office is perfectly acceptable and can be a smart business decision, so long as it is done in an ethical way. Confidentiality was severely breached in this particular environment. Boundaries were clearly an issue in this household. And the way she was soliciting business was a bit unethical in my opinion, even if it was on her friend's volition she is still responsible.

I never claimed that a professional needed to have a perfect life order to practice and be good at what you do. Therapists, Psychologists, Hynotherapists, are all normal people who endure the everyday happening of life. My point was simply that at some point when you can't separate your personal and professional life and when you are going through some really rough and out of the ordinary personal drama (your fault or not), you should consider the implications it has on your competence as a professional and how it may impact your client.


Yes the link is not for a private practice but for the Association of Applied Sport Psychology that provides solid information for professionals and the public. The purpose was to provide people with a resource that has a wide range of views and not simply my own. AASP is more or less the governing body of sport psychology (aside from APA div. 47.) Through AASP professionals become certified consultants and adhere to an additional ethical code to that of the APA.

And a final note on ethics as a whole...every professional has different interpretations to what is and isn't ethical. There are grey areas and practicing ethically at all times may be unrealistic as unintentional ethical violations do occur. Again no one is perfect or has a perfect life and the perfect choice is rarely made. The best we can do as professional, whatever your speciality, is to hold yourself to a high ethical standard and continually challenge those ethics. Is this my bias? Absolutely. Like I said this show challenged my ethics and left me a number of questions that made me reflect on what I would do in those situations. I would have done everything different compared to this character. I'm sorry but clients deserve more than remedial ethical practice. I will not be bending on that point.

Edited by M3sportpsych, 03 July 2011 - 07:14 PM.


#9 ScottBabb

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 04:03 AM

@M3sportpsych: Sorry for the confusion. I was addressing multiple posters aggregately in my post. The complaint about USA having shows with female leads who are good at their jobs but bad at their personal lives came from a different poster.

I'm a huge fan of sports psychology. Paraphrasing Dr. Dani: "At elite levels in sports, the game becomes largely mental." I've seen WAY too many coaches ignore the mental aspects of their players' games and suffer the consequences without ever knowing what was wrong. I think it's highly beneficial for entire teams AND their coaching and training staffs to engage sports psychologists and get assistance with the mental parts of their jobs.

I'm going to have to watch the show again to see exactly what was happening when the friend was soliciting business in the hair salon. I took that to be something she was doing without Dr. Dani actually knowing what was going on. If I knew someone was "helping" me that way, there'd be a reckoning that left no doubt in their minds that it was unacceptable.



@simplesins: I think the worst offender in the house is the grandmother with the gambling problem. She does make for an entertaining character, though. They do have to balance realism and entertainment in TV shows. At least they had Dr. Dani take a bit of a privacy/professionalism nutty on her kids and mother when they were waiting around to meet her new client. It had little actual effect, but she did try. She needs to try harder.

I share a waiting room with two other practitioners. We have music playing in the waiting room to mask what's going on in our individual offices. I also have different music playing in my office to further obscure anything being said from prying ears, and I work within a yard or so of my clients, so there's no need for either of us to speak loudly. I'm in a grey area where HIPAA probably doesn't apply to me (health insurance generally doesn't cover hypnosis, and I do not submit client claims to health insurers), but I still protect client records and privacy as if HIPAA did apply. I only share information with other practitioners a client is seeing after getting specific written consent from the client. I take client privacy very seriously.

I didn't see it as the daughter giving her approval so much as her simply expressing her support for her mother and letting her know that she thinks her mother can do the job and still be a good mother. People make major life decisions based on incomplete and/or inaccurate information all the time. The daughter just provided a little better info to her mother.

Maybe Dr. Dani should work out an arrangement with the football team to have their huge ex-Special Forces guy ride herd on the obnoxious daughter for a couple of weeks. I think the kid needs some no-nonsense structure and discipline in her life.

#10 VerenFV

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Posted 06 July 2011 - 02:04 AM

My complaint isn't that the female characters struggle through their personal lives that are completely messed up, it's that USA keeps putting the female leads of their shows in messed up private lives. It sends a message that a woman can't be a successful professional and have a normal private life. Annie in Covert Affairs is pretty close to normal, even though it's spy normal. The rest are all messed up, and the characters act like they can't control it at all. As was pointed out that she tried to keep people from waiting around to meet the client, but was unsuccessful. It jsut seems jacked up.

#11 M3sportpsych

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Posted 11 July 2011 - 10:43 PM

@M3sportpsych: Sorry for the confusion. I was addressing multiple posters aggregately in my post. The complaint about USA having shows with female leads who are good at their jobs but bad at their personal lives came from a different poster.

I'm a huge fan of sports psychology. Paraphrasing Dr. Dani: "At elite levels in sports, the game becomes largely mental." I've seen WAY too many coaches ignore the mental aspects of their players' games and suffer the consequences without ever knowing what was wrong. I think it's highly beneficial for entire teams AND their coaching and training staffs to engage sports psychologists and get assistance with the mental parts of their jobs.

I'm going to have to watch the show again to see exactly what was happening when the friend was soliciting business in the hair salon. I took that to be something she was doing without Dr. Dani actually knowing what was going on. If I knew someone was "helping" me that way, there'd be a reckoning that left no doubt in their minds that it was unacceptable.


Thank you for clarifying your point. Yeah I found what her friend was doing to be as classy and as ethical as Ambulance chasers.

#12 Awetmedic

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 04:35 PM

Sounds like you have no fun or humor in your life! The show isn't meant to qualify you for continuing education credits. Your whole dialog finishes with a link to a website which seems to be your whole motivation here. If you really are a psychology pro, why are you on here hawking a website and leaching off the popularity of this show instead of taking care of your clients? hmmmm, perhaps it is because your critical attitude dosn't seem to motivate your clients and you are on here desperate to find new business. What a lamer.

As an actual qualified Sport Psychology Consultant with a private practice, i'm really disappointed in the writers and producers of the show for their terrible portrayal of sport psychology. The character is not competent in sport psychology, lacked professionalism and had remedial ethics at best. I understand the show wants to make it interesting by adding drama, but this was just so wrong. A professional would not be practicing (in any area of psychology) if they were going through such severe personal problems. And the number one question Mental health professionals should ask themselves is what is in the best interest of the client. She was so self-serving and really didn't give a crap or even ask about the clients needs. She didn't bother building rapport and actually caused her client harm. Again I know this is a tv show and is suppose to be entertaining, I just don't want people thinking that this is how sport psychology works.

The one positive is that it tested my own ethics as a professional as I cringed at all of the ethical violations and errors made. I'm very passionate about my field and if you want to learn more about what sport psychology is really about check out www.appliedsportpsych.org



#13 LadyLi78

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 11:14 PM

REALLY?!?!?!?!?!? Its a TV show, strickly for entertainment purposes only.... who takes TV this seriously???? I LOVE the show, its funny! Get a grip on life..... do you see a disclaimer before or after the show warning people "PLEASE DO NOT TAKE THE ADVICE GIVEN ON THIS SHOW SERIOUSLY" ??? Noooo! So why do you??? Just enjoy it for what it is a TV SHOW...Hell, I'm going to school for nursing but do you see me bashing Grey's Anatomy or Private Practice???? Uh no! Does it mean I'm any less passionate about being a nurse??? Uh no! Relax......


Anyways, on to more important things, loved the show tonight.....my favorite part was when Dani came home to police at her house and she said " Officer I'd like to report a pre-meditated double homicide" (followed by the look of death) classic! I remember those looks when I was younger. Keep up the good work and ignore those who take this wwwwaaaaaaaaaaaaayyyyy too seriously.

Edited by LadyLi78, 13 July 2011 - 11:17 PM.


#14 zepplinskkc

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 06:08 PM

As I watched the first episode I picked out all the ethical violations and was somewhat annoyed with them. As someone going into the counseling field it was mildly annoying to me, but I didnít take it too seriously; it is a tv show. As much as I would love a show that actually showed what it was like to be a counselor, I just donít see it happening and being marketable to the mass public.;) Also, another thought I had regarding the ethical violations, the violations may resurface to biter her in the butt. For years Brenda on The Closer did things that were ethically questionable and it is now coming back to haunt her in the form of a lawsuit. Perhaps something of the sort would come up for Dani due to the lax way she deals with confidentiality.

I picked out the ethical violations and pointed them out to my daughter who was watching with me. There is of course, as has been hotly debated, the issue of whether she should have taken the job at all; if sheís not qualified then she really shouldnít have. However, I donít remember them asking her if she was a sport psychologist. I remember her stated her credentials and the coach not caring and just wanted the problem solved. That being the case, if they wanted a counselor thatís exactly what they got; so what if he is a professional football player. I donít really see an ethical violation there UNLESS she felt she wasnít qualified for the job; in that case she shouldnít have taken the job, but that wasnít the case.B)

As far as USAís use of lead female characters; ya, Iím kind of tired of it. However, I donít think Dani is a screwed up as whatever her name is on the mediation show that never watched after the 2 nd episode (couldnít stand the character) or Mary from IPS. Daniís life may be in upheaval, but she is suddenly getting a divorce, dealing with lawyers and a contesting husband, two teenage kids (one of whom is sometimes rebelling and acting out) and trying to drum up work when, apparently, her practice wasnít going full-time prior to the divorce.:blink: I DO LIKE that Dani is likeable (unlike the mediator chick and Mary of IPS) and not a push-over. People have messed up lives at times; even counselors.:)

My only real complaint about the show, other than the ethical violations, is the epilepsy crack. I found that hard to swallow and fear it may have offended some and drove them from the show. I find this unfortunate, since the show is pretty good, and sensitive (up to this point) and the comment regarding epilepsy had no place being in the show. :angry:

Oh ya, I realy like Nico!:D



Formerly, Bobbysthebest1 (couldnít get back in as the former me, so I changed)


#15 dimplzs

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 02:36 PM

REALLY?!?!?!?!?!? Its a TV show, strickly for entertainment purposes only.... who takes TV this seriously???? I LOVE the show, its funny! Get a grip on life..... do you see a disclaimer before or after the show warning people "PLEASE DO NOT TAKE THE ADVICE GIVEN ON THIS SHOW SERIOUSLY" ??? Noooo! So why do you??? Just enjoy it for what it is a TV SHOW...Hell, I'm going to school for nursing but do you see me bashing Grey's Anatomy or Private Practice???? Uh no! Does it mean I'm any less passionate about being a nurse??? Uh no! Relax......


Anyways, on to more important things, loved the show tonight.....my favorite part was when Dani came home to police at her house and she said " Officer I'd like to report a pre-meditated double homicide" (followed by the look of death) classic! I remember those looks when I was younger. Keep up the good work and ignore those who take this wwwwaaaaaaaaaaaaayyyyy too seriously.



LOL, I totally agree! I would like to think that the majority of the people who watch this show knows it's sheer ENTERTAINMENT! This show is based on a true story but they obviously have taken liberties for entertainment value. It's not that serious. I have to laugh at the posters who feel the need to clarify or defend whatever field they are in be it medical, legal, etc. as if the viewing public don't know what goes on in a hospital or have never been in a courtroom! It's flippin' TELEVISION for crying out loud!! And Necessary Roughness is a comedy/drama.

#16 TexasBlonde_1

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 03:40 PM

I do like it for its entertainment value on many fronts. Frankly, I have not seen Dani's character break the client/therapist confidentiality.

Frankly, I know of several therapists, even Ph.d. psychologists, who have divorced one or more times. That is a complete crock that the therapist should not be working if they have a problem in their personal life. Besides, she was not the one who was sleeping around with several different partners. I would have no respect for her character if she did not kick her husband out.

The behavior of her children just makes her human. She is not the first, nor will she be the last, parent who is totally embarrassed by what her children do even when she knows she taught them better. That is what kids do whether you are a lawyer, therapist, law enforcement officer, or work on a production line.

#17 dimplzs

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 09:23 PM

I do like it for its entertainment value on many fronts. Frankly, I have not seen Dani's character break the client/therapist confidentiality.

Frankly, I know of several therapists, even Ph.d. psychologists, who have divorced one or more times. That is a complete crock that the therapist should not be working if they have a problem in their personal life. Besides, she was not the one who was sleeping around with several different partners. I would have no respect for her character if she did not kick her husband out.

The behavior of her children just makes her human. She is not the first, nor will she be the last, parent who is totally embarrassed by what her children do even when she knows she taught them better. That is what kids do whether you are a lawyer, therapist, law enforcement officer, or work on a production line.



Very good points TexasBlonde_1!




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