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#141 Wardicus

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 08:28 AM

JONES
Will air on Bravo on October 17, 2010, at 9pm(EST) and January 18, 2010, at 3am(EST). First aired October 21, 2001. Fifth show of the First Season.

Written by Geoffrey Neighor and Rene Balcer
Directed by Frank Prinzi

Guest Cast:

Daniella Alonso as Angie Suarez
Griffin Dunne as Henry Talbott
Karen Young as Denise Talbott
Thomas G. Waites as Mo Turman (the bookie)
Leslie Hendrix as M.E. Rodgers
(Hendrix, Dunne, and Waites are all repeat offenders, or will be)

Synopsis: Goren and Eames follow the bodies of the mistresses of a lawyer whose life is in chaos.

Quotes:

Goren: "I like to dance."

Eames: "I didn't take this job to get noticed."

Goren: "I like Angie."

Eames: "Big day for little women."

Goren (examining a body): "Well, unless they're scenting the ocean with lavendar, this woman was drowned in a bathtub."

Goren: "Could be a serial killer...or a killing spree." Deakins: "Well, whatever they are...there's three of them."

Eames: "It looks like his train's about to run out of gravy."

Goren: "The only medical condition you have is denial."

Eames (after Denise refuses to turn on Henry): "So much for sisterhood."

Eames: "He's an equal opportunity sleezeball."

Goren: "Hey, Don Juan...You're under arrest."

Eames (to Talbott while waiting for Goren): "He likes to take his time."

Goren: “Come one, you’re a small guy. What size shoe do you wear? I wear a size thirteen. You look like a nine, or, what, like an eight?” Talbott: “I’m a …Oh, God, why am I even, I don’t want to talk to you about this! Don’t drag me into this!” Goren: “You have small hands, too!”

Goren (to Denise): "He's never been the man you thought you married. He never will be."

Eames: "I need to wash off the slime."
Queries

What do these women see in Henry? How did he meet Denise? Why does Denise stay with him?

Will Denise survive?

How did Henry get through Yale Law?

Is Angie Henry's first murder? If she was, would he have eventually killed one of his girlfriends?

Do Goren and Eames consider Rand a serious suspect? Is Rand guilty of anything?

What is Eames' reaction to Denise?

Is Denise the stupidest woman in the LOCI universe?

How does Eames react to being bait for Talbott?

This is a fairly explicit episode, beginning with the sexual encounter at the start, continuing with the comdon left on the kitchen floor, and, of course, that infamous "Size 13" conversation. Is it too explicit or exploitive?

I apologize for the few questions, but I do have a lot of comments that I hope will encourage some discussion.

I'm haunted by Angie, who appears to have been a sweet, gentle soul. Even her boss, who's more than a bit of a jerk, is disturbed by her death.

This is an episode which helped to cement my love for Goren and Eames. They both look beyond Angie's profession--which some might view as just above that of a prostitute--and see the real human being. I like the gentle way Goren interviews Angie's co-worker, the way he dances with her so she won't get in trouble, and the way he pays for her drinks and dance. This is a good man.

Deakins is watching out for his detectives. He urges both to take a post with the task force. And Goren is watching out for Eames--he notes it would be a good move for her.

There's some great points in this episode. The set dressing for Talbott's office is a terrific reflection of the chaos of the man's life. (Talbott's description of Rand's life is also a pretty good description of Talbott's life.) While I suspect that the one way mirror is unbreakable in real life, Talbott's shattering of it is a tremendous punctuation point on this story. And I love the final framing of Goren and Eames inside the shattered mirror.
Kudos to Griffin Dunne for playing such a sleeze so very well. And for taking that attack on his manhood.

A critic once commented that Kathryn Erbe was one of the few actresses who looked like she was actually physically strong enough to be a cop. And her shoulders look terrific. Erbe is really wonderful in his episode. D'Onofrio gets all the showy stuff, and he's wonderful at it, but Erbe gets some terrific snarky lines in this episode and she handles those and the massive exposition in this story with great skill.

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#142 Wardicus

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Posted 18 October 2010 - 08:24 AM

Well, did JONES ever air last night on Bravo? I apologize, but it was scheduled.

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#143 Wardicus

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Posted 21 October 2010 - 08:40 AM

ACTS OF CONTRITION

Will air 1pm(EST) on October 23, 2010, on WGN. First aired on October 23, 2005
. Fifth episode of Season Five.

Written by Warren Leight and Rene Balcer. Directed by Frank Prinzi.

Guest Actors:

Susan Misner as Sister Olivia (Ms. Misner would play Mary Devildis in FAMILY VALUES and played Becky Stark in SMOTHERED. A very talented actress.)
Amy Wright as Sister Dorothy
Larry Gilliard, Jr., as Eddie Roberts
Leslie Hendrix as M.E. Rodgers

Synopsis: The investigation of a nun’s murder leads to a tragic history.
Quotes:

Eames (to the girls): “We need you to be brave.” Sister Olivia: “They already are.”

Eames (to Goren): “You’re the lapsed altar boy. What’s the significance of wax?”

Sister Olivia: “Schizophrenics have it very hard. You don’t know.” Goren: “I do know, Sister.”

Goren: “It had to be something powerful to drive him to spend the last year and a half searching medical databases.” Carver: “I’ll rely on your own obsessiveness to find out what that thing is, Detective.”

Goren: “The speculation is that she maybe died from an overdose.” Eames: “I don’t know about died, but maybe gone to heaven.”

Eames: “Everything about him is off. He can’t look me in the eye. He talks about himself in the third person.” Carver: “Another eccentric New Yorker.”

Goren: “Was he big like me?” Sister Edwina: “Not so big. And not so Caucasian.”

Eddie: “Eddie Roberts is happily single. It’s the only way to get things done.” Eames: “Alex Eames says he’s a big phony.”

Deakins: “Black shirt. White shirt. Saturn Boy has a few loose rings.”

Sister Olivia (to Goren): “Don’t pretend to know me, Detective.”

Eames: “The department should hire a phelobotmist. They do a better job finding a witness.”

Goren: “Angie. You want deliverance. This is how.”

Eames: “You were right. There’s never enough truth.” Goren: “Or enough justice.”

Note: For information about Thalassemia, see http://en.wikipedia....iki/Thalassemia

Queries:

Did Sister Olivia get off too easily? Was Goren too sympathetic to her?

Is this episode too much like THE FAITHFUL? How is it different? In particular, how is the relationship between Carver and the detectives different?

How does this episode treat the Catholic Church? How does LOCI treat the Church?

Is the use of the “N” word justified?

If Eddie hadn’t worked with human blood, would he have been able to find Angie?

How long will Eddie be in prison? Who will take care of Jimmy?

Would it have been so terrible if Eddie had found and spoken to Angie/Sister Olivia?

How much time will Sister Olivia spend in jail? Who will take care of her girls? Will all of her good work be destroyed?

Has Sister Olivia confessed everything to the priest?

One of the great questions of this episode—Does a life of good work and unselfishness make up for one terrible act?

Comments:

I hope there will be some responses to my comments on this episode, one that I find richer, more moving, and more troubling with repeated viewings. The best LOCI episodes deal with moral conundrums, and there are many of them moving through this very well-written, deliberately paced, and well staged episode. Even characters with smaller parts are well written and acted. Sister Edwina, for example, is charmingly written, and the young actress portraying her is wonderful opposite Mr. D’Onofrio and Ms. Erbe. Larry Gilliard, Jr., is both infuriating and touching as Eddie Roberts, who is a remarkable mixture of a good man (obviously an exceptional brother) and an obsessed one. Mr. Gilliard’s delivery of Eddie’s eloquent speech about justice coming too late for old white men is extraordinary. And I’m not sure I can praise Susan Misner’s performance as Sister Olivia enough. She allows us to see the frightened, angry Angie Di Marco and the tough, good Sister Olivia. It’s one of the great LOCI guest performances. And applause for Courtney Vance. Every once in a while LOCI allowed him to show his great range and depth as an actor, and this is one of those episodes.

Lots of moments to like in this one as well. Eames tripping Enrique’s second during the raid. Goren playing with fire in front of Enrique. Rodgers, for once, gets to tell Goren something. The final scenes set in the church.

This is why I love LOCI. Subtle, multilayered, an exploration of moral issues, beautifully acted. (You may gather that I like this one.)

Submitted for your comments, considerations, and queries.

Wardicus

#144 Wardicus

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 08:21 AM

ACTS OF CONTRITION

Will air 1pm(EST) on October 23, 2010, on WGN. First aired on October 23, 2005
. Fifth episode of Season Five.

Written by Warren Leight and Rene Balcer. Directed by Frank Prinzi.

Guest Actors:

Susan Misner as Sister Olivia (Ms. Misner would play Mary Devildis in FAMILY VALUES and played Becky Stark in SMOTHERED. A very talented actress.)
Amy Wright as Sister Dorothy
Larry Gilliard, Jr., as Eddie Roberts
Leslie Hendrix as M.E. Rodgers

Synopsis: The investigation of a nun’s murder leads to a tragic history.
Quotes:

Eames (to the girls): “We need you to be brave.” Sister Olivia: “They already are.”

Eames (to Goren): “You’re the lapsed altar boy. What’s the significance of wax?”

Sister Olivia: “Schizophrenics have it very hard. You don’t know.” Goren: “I do know, Sister.”

Goren: “It had to be something powerful to drive him to spend the last year and a half searching medical databases.” Carver: “I’ll rely on your own obsessiveness to find out what that thing is, Detective.”

Goren: “The speculation is that she maybe died from an overdose.” Eames: “I don’t know about died, but maybe gone to heaven.”

Eames: “Everything about him is off. He can’t look me in the eye. He talks about himself in the third person.” Carver: “Another eccentric New Yorker.”

Goren: “Was he big like me?” Sister Edwina: “Not so big. And not so Caucasian.”

Eddie: “Eddie Roberts is happily single. It’s the only way to get things done.” Eames: “Alex Eames says he’s a big phony.”

Deakins: “Black shirt. White shirt. Saturn Boy has a few loose rings.”

Sister Olivia (to Goren): “Don’t pretend to know me, Detective.”

Eames: “The department should hire a phelobotmist. They do a better job finding a witness.”

Goren: “Angie. You want deliverance. This is how.”

Eames: “You were right. There’s never enough truth.” Goren: “Or enough justice.”

Note: For information about Thalassemia, see http://en.wikipedia....iki/Thalassemia

Queries:

Did Sister Olivia get off too easily? Was Goren too sympathetic to her?

Is this episode too much like THE FAITHFUL? How is it different? In particular, how is the relationship between Carver and the detectives different?

How does this episode treat the Catholic Church? How does LOCI treat the Church?

Is the use of the “N” word justified?

If Eddie hadn’t worked with human blood, would he have been able to find Angie?

How long will Eddie be in prison? Who will take care of Jimmy?

Would it have been so terrible if Eddie had found and spoken to Angie/Sister Olivia?

How much time will Sister Olivia spend in jail? Who will take care of her girls? Will all of her good work be destroyed?

Has Sister Olivia confessed everything to the priest?

One of the great questions of this episode—Does a life of good work and unselfishness make up for one terrible act?

Comments:

I hope there will be some responses to my comments on this episode, one that I find richer, more moving, and more troubling with repeated viewings. The best LOCI episodes deal with moral conundrums, and there are many of them moving through this very well-written, deliberately paced, and well staged episode. Even characters with smaller parts are well written and acted. Sister Edwina, for example, is charmingly written, and the young actress portraying her is wonderful opposite Mr. D’Onofrio and Ms. Erbe. Larry Gilliard, Jr., is both infuriating and touching as Eddie Roberts, who is a remarkable mixture of a good man (obviously an exceptional brother) and an obsessed one. Mr. Gilliard’s delivery of Eddie’s eloquent speech about justice coming too late for old white men is extraordinary. And I’m not sure I can praise Susan Misner’s performance as Sister Olivia enough. She allows us to see the frightened, angry Angie Di Marco and the tough, good Sister Olivia. It’s one of the great LOCI guest performances. And applause for Courtney Vance. Every once in a while LOCI allowed him to show his great range and depth as an actor, and this is one of those episodes.

Lots of moments to like in this one as well. Eames tripping Enrique’s second during the raid. Goren playing with fire in front of Enrique. Rodgers, for once, gets to tell Goren something. The final scenes set in the church.

This is why I love LOCI. Subtle, multilayered, an exploration of moral issues, beautifully acted. (You may gather that I like this one.)

Submitted for your comments, considerations, and queries.

Wardicus



#145 Wardicus

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 08:25 AM

FRAME

Will air 8am(EST) on November 1, 2010, on the USA Network. The 22nd episode of Season Seven. First aired August 24, 2008.

Written by Julie Martin, Katie Rorrick, and Warren Leight. Directed by Norberto Barba

Guest Actors:

Leslie Hendrix as M.E. Rodgers
Olivia D’Abo as Nicole Wallace
Tony Goldwyn as Frank Goren
Molly Gottlieb as Gwen Chapel
John Glover as Declan Gage
Note—everyone in the cast is a repeat offender.

Synopsis: Someone is trying to frame Goren for the murders of Frank Goren and Nicole Wallace.

Quotes:

Nicole (as she died, according to Gage): “Tell Bobby he was the only man I ever loved.”

Ross (to Goren): “Nicole Wallace. I’m told she’s your white whale.”

Eames (to Goren): “Someone is gaslighting you.”

Eames: “With serial killers, the most important interview is with someone who survives.”

Gage (to Goren): “No one came through for you.”

Goren (to Gage): “You cut and pasted the pieces of my life.”

Gage: “You’re free, Bobby. You’re free.”

Queries:

How did Gage learn about Bobby’s biological father? Did Bobby willingly tell him?

Does Alex know about Bobby’s biological father before the DNA test results are revealed?

Who’s wrong—Rodgers for revealing the test, or Bobby for asking for it and then invading the morgue?

Why did Rodgers cover for Bobby?

Does Ross really think Bobby killed Frank and Nicole?

Was Gage ever a great profiler?

How long was Bobby with Gage? Is it possible Gage overestimates his influence on Bobby? What caused them to not talk for several years?

Does Eames hate Gage? Does Gage hate Eames?

Is Gage still alive? Did he ever see the inside of a courtroom?

Is Jo still alive? Why did she bite her tongue?

There are several questions about the timing of Frances Goren’s birth. Is it possible Frank forgot her birthday, or claimed the date in order to get sympathy?

Did Nicole think she was helping Bobby by killing Frank? Is that how Gage convinced her to kill Frank?

Can we trust anything Gage says?

Was the rest of Nicole’s body ever found?

Are Gage and Bobby the only two men Nicole failed to seduce? Is that why they survived their contact with her? Is it why she was obsessed with Bobby?

Why is Eames so convinced Bobby didn’t kill Frank or Nicole? Her attitude is a great change from PURGATORY. What happened to change it?

Did these events result in a rebirth for Bobby? For LOCI?

Comments:

My view of Declan Gage: Self serving, selfish, egotistic, manipulative, sexist slimeball. Kudos to John Glover for a brilliant, selfless performance.

I admit there are plot holes you could drive a large tank through in this story. I would’ve liked to have actually seen Nicole’s body. But the acting and the story’s roller coaster turns and drops more than make up for its flaws. I thought the irony of having Nicole manipulated and killed by Bobby’s “mentor” brilliant. I recall holding my breath during the last “duet” between Bobby and Gage. The writing, direction, and acting in those last scenes subtly and wonderfully showed how Gage went from being the interrogator to the interrogated.

Submitted, as always, for your responses and remarks.

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#146 Wardicus

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 09:27 AM

Will air 5pm (EST) on November 6 on WGN. First aired: April 27, 2003, the 19th show of the Second Season

Director: Frank Prinzi. Written by: Jim Serling and Rene Balcer

Guest Cast:
Dennis Christopher as Roger Coffman
Paul Dooley as Stan Coffman
Kevin Breznahan asLewis

Brief Synopis: While investigating the death of a young woman, Eames and Goren uncover a city official's possible involvement in her death and in a corruption scheme. The key to solving the case lies in the official's relationship with his ailing father.

Point of interest: Dennis Christopher and Paul Dooley portrayed a son and father involved in a far healthier relationship in the 1979 film BREAKING AWAY.

Return Offender: Kevin Breznahan as Goren's friend, Lewis.
Quotes:
James Deakins: Bonds are a little like potato chips, people don't usually buy just one.
Robert Goren: It's a homeopathic remedy for cat allergies. Microscopic cat dander you put on your tongue. I had a girlfriend named Lola, she had cats. Alex Eames: You ate furballs for her?
(Goren is enjoying his time behind the wheel of the cherry red car.) Alex Eames: You have to come out now.
(Sitting in a 1962 Ferrari GTO belonging to the criminal.) Robert Goren: I wish I could tell you how this feels, I can't do it in mixed company, but I wish I could. (revs the engine and smiles) You have no idea. Roger: You son of a bitch. Robert Goren: (leans out of the car and smiles) You have no idea.
Stan Coffman: (referring to Goren) You know, you're awfully snoopy. Alex Eames: A lot of people point that out.
Robert Goren: The reason why I keep harping on the bearer bond– do you have a medical condition?

Alex Eames: Maybe she thought she'd inherit some cash to go with the cats.
Queries:

There are many who consider its second season to be LOCI's best, and this entry in that season to be one of the best episodes of the show. Is this one of the best? And what makes a great LOCI episode?
What’s the state of the Eames/Goren relationship in this story?

There are two (possibly three if Goren's relationship with his mother is included) depictions of an adult child dealing with an ailing parent. How are they shown? How are they different? And how do they fit in with LOCI's other families?

How do Roger and Stan Coffman rank among the LOCI villains? Who's the greater villain of the two?

Would Roger have been able to continue to get away with his scheme if he hadn't reached too far?
Was Roger going to take the car and leave his father?
How long will Stan last in prison?

Goren and Carver appear to make a connection over their shared admiration of the model cars. Does this mark a change in their relationship?

A few comments: This episode has what appear to be several scenes that are audience favorites, including Goren's "deflowering" of the Ferrari and Eames' comment, "You have to get out now" and the previously mentioned "playdate" of Goren and Carver.

Throughout this episode, Eames takes on the role of something of a female observer of the boys at play, and she regards Goren, Carver, Lewis, and most of the males with the bemusement of an older sister, or the female friend who was allowed in the treehouse.

Patcat (again, feedback appreciated)

#147 Wardicus

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 09:29 AM

CHERRY RED

Will air 5pm (EST) on November 6 on WGN. First aired: April 27, 2003, the 19th show of the Second Season

Director: Frank Prinzi. Written by: Jim Serling and Rene Balcer

Guest Cast:
Dennis Christopher as Roger Coffman
Paul Dooley as Stan Coffman
Kevin Breznahan as Lewis

Brief Synopis: While investigating the death of a young woman, Eames and Goren uncover a city official's possible involvement in her death and in a corruption scheme. The key to solving the case lies in the official's relationship with his ailing father.

Point of interest: Dennis Christopher and Paul Dooley portrayed a son and father involved in a far healthier relationship in the 1979 film BREAKING AWAY.

Return Offender: Kevin Breznahan as Goren's friend, Lewis.

Quotes:
James Deakins: Bonds are a little like potato chips, people don't usually buy just one.

Robert Goren: It's a homeopathic remedy for cat allergies. Microscopic cat dander you put on your tongue. I had a girlfriend named Lola, she had cats. Alex Eames: You ate furballs for her?

(Goren is enjoying his time behind the wheel of the cherry red car.) Alex Eames: You have to come out now.

(Sitting in a 1962 Ferrari GTO belonging to the criminal.) Robert Goren: I wish I could tell you how this feels, I can't do it in mixed company, but I wish I could. (revs the engine and smiles) You have no idea. Roger: You son of a bitch. Robert Goren: (leans out of the car and smiles) You have no idea.

Stan Coffman: (referring to Goren) You know, you're awfully snoopy. Alex Eames: A lot of people point that out.

Robert Goren: The reason why I keep harping on the bearer bond– do you have a medical condition?

Alex Eames: Maybe she thought she'd inherit some cash to go with the cats.

Queries:

There are many who consider its second season to be LOCI's best, and this entry in that season to be one of the best episodes of the show. Is this one of the best? And what makes a great LOCI episode?

What’s the state of the Eames/Goren relationship in this story?

There are two (possibly three if Goren's relationship with his mother is included) depictions of an adult child dealing with an ailing parent. How are they shown? How are they different? And how do they fit in with LOCI's other families?

How do Roger and Stan Coffman rank among the LOCI villains? Who's the greater villain of the two?

Would Roger have been able to continue to get away with his scheme if he hadn't reached too far?

Was Roger going to take the car and leave his father?

How long will Stan last in prison?

Goren and Carver appear to make a connection over their shared admiration of the model cars. Does this mark a change in their relationship?

A few comments: This episode has what appear to be several scenes that are audience favorites, including Goren's "deflowering" of the Ferrari and Eames' comment, "You have to get out now" and the previously mentioned "playdate" of Goren and Carver.

Throughout this episode, Eames takes on the role of something of a female observer of the boys at play, and she regards Goren, Carver, Lewis, and most of the males with the bemusement of an older sister, or the female friend who was allowed in the treehouse.

Patcat (again, feedback appreciated)
[/quote]

#148 Wardicus

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Posted 11 November 2010 - 09:04 AM

BLINK

Will air 3pm(EST) on November 13 on WGN First aired May 4, 2003. 20th Episode of Season 2.

Written by Gerry Conway and Rene BalcerDirected by Don Scardino

Guest Actors:

Ian Kahn as Ken Harris
Angel Christian as Kerry Harris
Robert Hogan as Ferdie

Synopsis: The murder of a university math student lead Goren and Eames to a perp who's literally fearless.

Quotes:

Goren: "The Bahamas. The place for math majors."

Eames: "I call it counting cards."

Goren: "He's entered the lion's den. Bold." Eames: "He's out of his mind." Goren: "It's worse. He doesn't know fear."

Ken Harris: "You panic. You die."

Goren: "Now do we have your attention?"

Eames: "Well, will wonders never cease? He blinked." Carver: "He may be human after all." Goren: "Optimist."

Queries:

Does Ken Harris really "Blink"?

Does Ken care for his wife and child? Is he capable of love?

Kerry Harris obviously knows some of what her husband is up to. Why does she go along with his plans? And why does he allow him to take their son with them? Does she know he's a murderer? Does she think him capable of murder?

Is this Ken's first murder?

Does Ken underestimate Goren and Eames?

Does Ken realize that other people don't experience fear?

Why does Kerry's abandonment cause Ken to collapse?

What will happen to Kerry and her son?

What is going on with Major Case Squad's security?

What does this episode tell us about Bobby?

Is Bobby really afraid of heights? What is Bobby afraid of?

Did Frank come to his father's funeral?

Comments: Another gem from the second season, although I must confess that after multiple viewings I'm still not quite certain how the whole horse betting thing worked. But we get to see Captain Deakins in civilian clothes, Eames displaying her technical savvy, and lots of Bobby details. There's his six months in Korea, where he ate octupus and, we now know, encountered Declan Gage. We encounter one of his father's old associates, who appears to have some affection for Bobby. We even get to see a photo of Rene Balcer as a member of the Israeli mob (He's the "murderer.") Frankly, I didn't know there was an Israeli mob or that it was so vicious. There're several great scenes, including the one where Kathryn Erbe subtly and silently conveys Eames' growing frustration with Carver's destruction of the case. The final scenes where Goren forces Kerry to confront her fears about Ken and Ken realizes Kerry has given up on him are well staged and filmed.

And engineers don't seem to fare well in the LOCI world, do they?

Submitted for your comments.

Wardicus

#149 Wardicus

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 09:17 AM

HOMO HOMINI LUPUS
Will air on the USA Network on November 22 at 1pm(EST).First aired March 3, 2002. The fourteenth episode of the first season.
Written by Rene Balcer .Directed by David Platt

Synopis: The kidnapping of an executive's wife and daughters lead Goren and Eames to a vicious rapist and extortionist.

Guest Actors: John Colby (Lucas Coultor); Ritchie Coster (Simon Matic); Jordan Charney (Melvyn Coultor); Marianne Hagan (Susan Coultor); Stephi Lineburg (Maggie Coultor)

Quotes: I'd like to put in both Goren's interview with Maggie Coultor and his final confrontation with Matic, but I'll settle for the following:

Goren: "You raped her body. You raped her mind, you turned her head inside out, but she got you. She. Got. You."

Carver: "The dominos are falling, Mr. Pettijohn, you want to get ahead of them before they fall on you."
Carver: “Mr. Matic’s rambling days are over.”

Queries:

Why is this a Major Case case? Is it more of a case for SVU?

Is Lucas Coultor a bad man? Is Melvyn Coultor a bad man?

Did Mrs. Coultor push her husband to embezzle the funds from his company?

Will the Coultor marriage survive? Will Lucas go to jail?

How well does Matic describe Lucas Coultor?

Is this story exploitive?

While we've frequently seen both Goren and Eames draw their weapons, Eames has actually shot and killed a man twice. Aside from killing Nicole in one version of GREAT BARRIER, Goren has not. Why is Eames given this role?

Will Maggie survive? Will her sister Sarah, who seems to get lost in this story?

Why does Goren rather than Eames take the lead in the interview and in comforting Maggie?

One of the perceptive commentaries I read on TV.com suggested that Goren identifies with Maggie. Comments?

Does Goren heal himself by helping Maggie to heal?

Wild speculation of the week—I’ve read interviews with some LOCI writers, notably Stephanie Sengtupta, indicating Bobby Goren was physically abused as a child. Is it possible that he was sexually abused as well? (Yea, let’s just dump more on the poor guy.)
Comments:
This is one of my favorite LOCI episodes. Very well-written and acted, especially by Stephi Lindberg as Maggie Coultor. Ms. Erbe and Mr. D’Onofrio are in terrific form as well, and the interview scene with the detectives and Maggie is great, one of the best in LOCI.

Submitted for your comments, consideration, and catcalls.

Wardicus

#150 skittles4me

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Posted 20 November 2010 - 10:23 PM

HOMO HOMINI LUPUS
Will air on the USA Network on November 22 at 1pm(EST).First aired March 3, 2002. The fourteenth episode of the first season.
Written by Rene Balcer .Directed by David Platt

Synopis: The kidnapping of an executive's wife and daughters lead Goren and Eames to a vicious rapist and extortionist.

Guest Actors: John Colby (Lucas Coultor); Ritchie Coster (Simon Matic); Jordan Charney (Melvyn Coultor); Marianne Hagan (Susan Coultor); Stephi Lineburg (Maggie Coultor)

Quotes: I'd like to put in both Goren's interview with Maggie Coultor and his final confrontation with Matic, but I'll settle for the following:

Goren: "You raped her body. You raped her mind, you turned her head inside out, but she got you. She. Got. You."

Carver: "The dominos are falling, Mr. Pettijohn, you want to get ahead of them before they fall on you."
Carver: "Mr. Matic's rambling days are over."

Queries:

Why is this a Major Case case? Is it more of a case for SVU?
It belonged to Major Case first, before they knew about the rape. I always assumed that they kept the case because they had done so much work on it already and were invested. Also, (not to diminish how awful it was) the rape was not the primary intent of the kidnapping.

Is Lucas Coultor a bad man? Is Melvyn Coultor a bad man?
Lucas wasn't evil, but he was greedy and irresponsible. Melvyn, as a father, was just practicing "tough love" by not giving him the money until he heard what happened to Maggie. I think that makes Melvyn a good man.

Did Mrs. Coultor push her husband to embezzle the funds from his company?
I didn't get that impression. I thought she didn't know.

Will the Coultor marriage survive? Will Lucas go to jail?
Probably not. Susan likely will blame him for what happened to Maggie and it would be hard to trust him again.
Probably, if Carver has anything to do with it!


How well does Matic describe Lucas Coultor?
Will have to watch again.

Is this story exploitive?
Not in my opinion.

While we've frequently seen both Goren and Eames draw their weapons, Eames has actually shot and killed a man twice. Aside from killing Nicole in one version of GREAT BARRIER, Goren has not. Why is Eames given this role?
Hmmmm. This episode was in season one. The personalities of Goren and Eames were revealed very slowly, but Goren was mostly in the spotlight. Seeing Alex not hesitate to shoot the bad guy to defend herself let us know that she was a tough, capable cop who didn't need to ride Goren's coattails or have someone take care of her.

Will Maggie survive? Will her sister Sarah, who seems to get lost in this story?
I don't know about the prognosis for kidnapping/rape victims. I would hope that they received therapy for a long time. They are lucky to have a loving family (mom, maternal grandmother, paternal grandfather). Dad certainly loves them too, but they would have some issues to work thru IMO. Maggie especially would have to confront a lot of mixed up feelings about their dad (blame, anger, etc.)

Why does Goren rather than Eames take the lead in the interview and in comforting Maggie?
Eames is more the "procedural" cop. The speech she started with Maggie sounded like something out of a textbook: WHAT TO SAY TO VICTIMS OF KIDNAPPING AND RAPE. Goren goes with his emotions and he has a soft heart, a DEEP UNDERSTANDING OF HUMAN behavior.

One of the perceptive commentaries I read on TV.com suggested that Goren identifies with Maggie. Comments?
Hmmmmm (thinking)

Does Goren heal himself by helping Maggie to heal?
Still thinking...

Wild speculation of the week—I've read interviews with some LOCI writers, notably Stephanie Sengtupta, indicating Bobby Goren was physically abused as a child. Is it possible that he was sexually abused as well? (Yea, let's just dump more on the poor guy.)
Comments: I can see that he was possibly physically abused- his family certainly wasn't "Leave it to Beaver". Don't know what I think about him being sexually abused.
This episode was during season one, but by the end of season eight there were hints that EAMES had been sexually abused. IMO


This is one of my favorite LOCI episodes. Very well-written and acted, especially by Stephi Lindberg as Maggie Coultor. Ms. Erbe and Mr. D'Onofrio are in terrific form as well, and the interview scene with the detectives and Maggie is great, one of the best in LOCI.

This is one of the first LOCI episodes I ever saw and I was instantly hooked!
I loved when Goren found Simon by calling his cell in the restaurant and heard the "Bonanza" theme song!

Submitted for your comments, consideration, and catcalls.

Wardicus


Thank you Wardicus for posting these thought provoking questions! I look forward to "discussing" this with you more! I responded to this from memory but if I get the chance to see it when it is on again I might edit my answers.

Skittles

Edited by skittles4me, 21 November 2010 - 02:00 AM.

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#151 Wardicus

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Posted 24 November 2010 - 09:14 AM

SOUND BODIES
Will air 5pm (EST) on WGN, November 27. First aired November 16, 2003. Eighth episode of Season 3.

Written by Rene Balcer. Directed by Jean de Segonzac and Frank Prinzi.

Guest Actors:
Billy Lush as Co
nnie (Connie would return in IN THE WEE SMALL HOURS)
Nathalie Paulding as Tina
Shayne Levine as Claudia

Repeat offenders:

Leslie Hendrix as M.E. Rodgers
Samantha Buck as Bishop

Synopsis: Goren and Bishop’s investigation of poisonings at a church meeting lead them to a small community with murderous secrets.

Quotes:

Deakins: “The killer was targeting people on diets?”

Eames (to Bishop, while both watching Goren listen to tape): “Want me to stick a fork in him?”

Goren (about the gonorrhea strain): “So they got it from the same girl.” Rogers: “Unless toilet seats and doorknobs are making a comeback.”

Goren (after Connie slaps him): “Ouch!”

Goren (to Connie): “You just wait with your little fishing rod, and you just hook whatever damaged goods come out of the pit.”

Connie: “She was mine. What did you do to her?”

Goren: “Oh, look. Look. Bing! Reality. People leave you. Your mother, and soon, your uncle.”

Conne: “Their parents made them what they are. I didn’t do anything.”

Ripped from the headlines:

Sadly, Connie could be based on a number of figures, from Charles Manson to David Koresh to Jim Jones. The church poisonings appear to be based on the Gustavo Adolph Lutheran Church poisonings of 2003. See http://en.wikipedia....wiki/New_Sweden, Maine For more information on arsenic, see http://en.wikipedia....senic_poisoning

Queries:

Was Goren like Connie?

Where is Connie now? What about the girls?

Could Connie have been a force for good? Was there a place for him?

Why were the parents so oblivious?

Why did the poisonings take place?

Is Eames “put a dart in him” comment cruel?

Does Bishop’s attitude towards Goren change in this episode?

Does Goren’s attitude towards Bishop change?

Comments: I like this episode for several reasons. Its depictions of high school as hell—along the lines of BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER—and the insular, suffocating world of a small town are dead on. There’s a meticulous investigation by Goren and Bishop (and, look, Goren can function without Eames! He may not like it, we may not like it, but he can.) And there’s a terrific performance by Billy Lush as Connie, with a great duet between Mr. Lush and Mr. D’Onofrio at the end.

Submitted, in hopes you’ll have a chance to see this episode in the midst of the after Thanksgiving hysteria.

Wardicus

#152 skittles4me

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Posted 27 November 2010 - 11:32 PM

SOUND BODIES
Will air 5pm (EST) on WGN, November 27. First aired November 16, 2003. Eighth episode of Season 3.

Written by Rene Balcer. Directed by Jean de Segonzac and Frank Prinzi.

Guest Actors:
Billy Lush as Co
nnie (Connie would return in IN THE WEE SMALL HOURS)
Nathalie Paulding as Tina
Shayne Levine as Claudia

Repeat offenders:

Leslie Hendrix as M.E. Rodgers
Samantha Buck as Bishop

Synopsis: Goren and Bishop's investigation of poisonings at a church meeting lead them to a small community with murderous secrets.

Quotes: These are so good!

Deakins: "The killer was targeting people on diets?"

Eames (to Bishop, while both watching Goren listen to tape): "Want me to stick a fork in him?"

Goren (about the gonorrhea strain): "So they got it from the same girl." Rogers: "Unless toilet seats and doorknobs are making a comeback."
Rodgers has the best lines! Just love her.
Goren (after Connie slaps him): "Ouch!" LOL great reaction!

Goren (to Connie): "You just wait with your little fishing rod, and you just hook whatever damaged goods come out of the pit."

Connie: "She was mine. What did you do to her?"

Goren: "Oh, look. Look. Bing! Reality. People leave you. Your mother, and soon, your uncle."

Conne: "Their parents made them what they are. I didn't do anything."

Ripped from the headlines:

Sadly, Connie could be based on a number of figures, from Charles Manson to David Koresh to Jim Jones. The church poisonings appear to be based on the Gustavo Adolph Lutheran Church poisonings of 2003. See http://en.wikipedia....wiki/New_Sweden, Maine For more information on arsenic, see http://en.wikipedia....senic_poisoning

Queries:

Was Goren like Connie? This goes back to the "could have gone either way" statement. They both had abandonment
issues, didn't fit in with their high school peers, and read many books. Connie could manipulate girls to do whatever he said and I think Bobby could have too if he had wanted to. However, I felt that Connie was just evil inside, that his circumstances may have influenced him, but the evil was there. We know Bobby went the way he did because he is a good person at heart.
Where is Connie now? What about the girls?
Aren't they still in prison? They were as of season 5 "In the Wee small hours".
Could Connie have been a force for good? Was there a place for him?
He was highly intelligent and knew how to use and influence people. It is possible that he could have been a force for good if that had been in his nature and/or he had grown up with love and security. (But I still don't think any good was in his inner "core")
Why were the parents so oblivious? That's a hard one! I'm a parent and I (hope I) keep tabs on what my kids are doing and who they hang out with. *sigh* You just do your best and try to be aware.

Why did the poisonings take place?
Weren't they targeting the mom of one of the drowning victims who was going to have the "accident" investigated? They must have considered the other's who were poisoned "collateral damage". Connie and the girls didn't want it revealed that the drownings were intentional.
Is Eames "put a dart in him" comment cruel?
Nah. Just her snarky Eames humor. Bishop could have learned a lot from her and lightened up a little. I mean who would YOU rather work with?
Does Bishop's attitude towards Goren change in this episode?
Hmmm
Does Goren's attitude towards Bishop change?
Hmmm Guess I wasn't that perceptive. I really REALLY didn't like Bishop. This was my favorite of the ones with her and I haven't seen the others for a long time.
Comments: I like this episode for several reasons. Its depictions of high school as hell—along the lines of BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER—and the insular, suffocating world of a small town are dead on. There's a meticulous investigation by Goren and Bishop (and, look, Goren can function without Eames! He may not like it, we may not like it, but he can.) Well, sure he can. He made it to MCS before he partnered with her. In narcotics he had 27 arrests and 27 convictions. He can function. And people lived for centuries without electricity, indoor plumbing, medicine, grocery stores, cars, phones, tv, computers, sliced bread...doesn't mean that most of us would want to go there again. Posted Image And there's a terrific performance by Billy Lush as Connie, with a great duet between Mr. Lush and Mr. D'Onofrio at the end.

Submitted, in hopes you'll have a chance to see this episode in the midst of the after Thanksgiving hysteria.

Wardicus



Thanks again Wardicus! I love "discussing" my favorite show!
Skittles

Edited by skittles4me, 29 November 2010 - 01:09 AM.

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#153 Wardicus

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Posted 02 December 2010 - 09:11 AM

BRIGHT BOY
Will air on USA on December 6 at 12pm(EST). Second episode of the second season. First aired October 6, 2002

Written by Marlane Gomard Meyer and Rene Balcer Directed by Frank Prinzi

Guest Actors:

Tim Guinee as David Bishop
Liam Aiken as Robby Bishop

Synopsis: The murders of a Deputy Mayor and a city social worker lead Goren and Eames to a bright boy and his ambitious father.

Quotes:

Eames: "I was so well adjusted they elected me Prom Queen." Goren: "I had to go to my counselor's office and have a talk with the school shrink."

Eames: "There can't be many places in town that give mortarboards to Baby Einsteins."

Eames: "You have to forgive my partner, Dr. Leonard. He's feeling very humble right now."

Robby: "What's fun for me isn't always fun for my Dad."

Eames: "I can tell from the bull he was telling his wife."

Dr. Leonard: "I hope you're not suggesting..." Goren: "We are."

Robby: "Baseball's the thinking man's game."

Deakins: "Dads kill over hockey. Why not education?"

David Bishop: "There's nothing I hate more than discussing my child with a know-it-all."

Goren: "Not realizing his Dad isn't like any forty-year-old."

Goren: "Worse thing for him? He'll miss Robby's college graduation."

Trivia--The Riemenn Hypothesis exists. It was first proposed by Bernhard Riemenn in 1859. It’s been unsolved for over 150 years. The Clay Mathematics Institute offers a one million dollars prize for its solution.

This story may be based on the Justin Chapman case. Justin was considered a child genius, but it was revealed that his mother Elizabeth fabricated and manipulated test results. Justin was eventually removed from her custody and reportedly suffered psychological damage as a result of her actions.


Queries:

Does Robby's father care for his son at all, or only live for the reflected glory?

David Bishop has a history of not finishing things. Would he have finished Robby?

Who keeps their old report cards?

Does David really believe Robby is a genius?

What happened to Robby's mother? Was it an accident?

Would Robby have killed himself?

Will Robby survive? What will happen to him?

Why didn't the social worker pick up on how unhappy and troubled Robby was? Why didn't anyone?

Does the victim get lost in this story?

Is Dr. Leonard also a villain in this story?

Have Robby and his father moved a lot?

Anyone uncomfortable with Goren manipulating a troubled little boy in an interrogation?

If a Deputy Mayor wasn't involved, would Major Case have been called? And if Goren and Eames weren't on the case, would David Bishop gotten away?

Does Goren see himself in Robby? Or perhaps he sees Frank?

What is the Goren and Eames relationship like in this episode?

What is Carver's role?

Who's the Bright Boy? Just Robby, or possibly Goren and David Bishop?

Comments: Oh, I like this episode, another where we visit over ambitious parents We get Bobby in sunglasses, Alex snark, Bobby and Alex acting as a great team, and that lovely exchange between Alex and Bobby that reveals a bit of what their high school lives were like. (Does anyone else see both surprise and a certain wistful envy in Bobby's reaction to Alex's comment that she was Prom Queen?) There's the great visualizations of Robby's despair and Bobby's recognition of it by comparing Robby's work with Charlie Rasmussen's. (I love Charlie by the way, and the kid's interaction with his mother and the detectives. I think that kid is going to be all right.)

And there's one of the great guest actor performances in LOCI by the young Liam Aiken. Before the film's producers decided they had to cast an English actor, Mr. Aiken was apparently in the running for the role of Harry Potter. He has gone on to play Klaus in the film adaptation of the LEMONY SNICKETT novels, and was splendid in the role. I hope he continues acting and gets good roles. He has an intelligent, watchful quality that's very appealing. Without overdoing a plea for the audience's sympathy or attention, Mr. Aiken is absolutely heartbreaking as Robby, and his work with Mr. D'Onofrio is stunning. Watch how he warily and carefully watches his father. In his last scene with Mr. D'Onofrio, watch how Mr. Aiken plays with the baseball and tries alternately to hide and then release his notebook. I don't know who came up with those bits of business, but they are perfect, and Mr. Aiken performs beautifully.

For your consideration and comments.

Wardicus

#154 maye

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 09:38 AM

BRIGHT BOY
Will air on USA on December 6 at 12pm(EST). Second episode of the second season. First aired October 6, 2002

Written by Marlane Gomard Meyer and Rene Balcer Directed by Frank Prinzi

Guest Actors:

Tim Guinee as David Bishop
Liam Aiken as Robby Bishop

Synopsis: The murders of a Deputy Mayor and a city social worker lead Goren and Eames to a bright boy and his ambitious father.

Quotes:

Eames: "I was so well adjusted they elected me Prom Queen." Goren: "I had to go to my counselor's office and have a talk with the school shrink."
I can just see Eames dancing to Abba's "Dancing Queen". :)

Eames: "There can't be many places in town that give mortarboards to Baby Einsteins."

Eames: "You have to forgive my partner, Dr. Leonard. He's feeling very humble right now."

Robby: "What's fun for me isn't always fun for my Dad."

Eames: "I can tell from the bull he was telling his wife."

Dr. Leonard: "I hope you're not suggesting..." Goren: "We are."

Robby: "Baseball's the thinking man's game."
After watching that scene, I wondered who is Goren's favorite baseball team?

Deakins: "Dads kill over hockey. Why not education?"

David Bishop: "There's nothing I hate more than discussing my child with a know-it-all."

Goren: "Not realizing his Dad isn't like any forty-year-old."

Goren: "Worse thing for him? He'll miss Robby's college graduation."

Trivia--The Riemenn Hypothesis exists. It was first proposed by Bernhard Riemenn in 1859. It’s been unsolved for over 150 years. The Clay Mathematics Institute offers a one million dollars prize for its solution.

This story may be based on the Justin Chapman case. Justin was considered a child genius, but it was revealed that his mother Elizabeth fabricated and manipulated test results. Justin was eventually removed from her custody and reportedly suffered psychological damage as a result of her actions.


Queries:

Does Robby's father care for his son at all, or only live for the reflected glory?
He provided basic needs. He was living vicariously through Robby.

David Bishop has a history of not finishing things. Would he have finished Robby?
I think if Robby didn't find a way out.

Who keeps their old report cards?
We were told all through school to keep our report cards.

Does David really believe Robby is a genius?
I think David thinks he is a genius for discovering that Robby maybe a genius.

What happened to Robby's mother? Was it an accident?
She probrably couldn't take it anymore. Can you imagine living with someone like David?

Would Robby have killed himself?
I think if David's demands increased, it could have been a possibility.

Will Robby survive? What will happen to him?
Yes. He will be living with his dream family and playing baseball.

Why didn't the social worker pick up on how unhappy and troubled Robby was? Why didn't anyone?
I think she did, she was gathering all her information to tell David.

Does the victim get lost in this story?
There were two victims, the social worker and Robby.

Is Dr. Leonard also a villain in this story?
David was the villain. On a personal note, I detest people who prey upon child prodigy's and use them to their own advantages. There is a way to encourage and support their gift without robbing them of their childhood and development.

Have Robby and his father moved a lot?
I believe so.

Anyone uncomfortable with Goren manipulating a troubled little boy in an interrogation?
No, not in this situation.

If a Deputy Mayor wasn't involved, would Major Case have been called? And if Goren and Eames weren't on the case, would David Bishop gotten away?
Major case would not have been called and David would have gotten away.

Does Goren see himself in Robby? Or perhaps he sees Frank?
No. He felt empathy towards Robby.

What is the Goren and Eames relationship like in this episode?
Two detectives working a case. (I'm not a shipper!)

What is Carver's role?

Who's the Bright Boy? Just Robby, or possibly Goren and David Bishop?
Always Goren! :)

Comments: Oh, I like this episode, another where we visit over ambitious parents We get Bobby in sunglasses, Alex snark, Bobby and Alex acting as a great team, and that lovely exchange between Alex and Bobby that reveals a bit of what their high school lives were like. (Does anyone else see both surprise and a certain wistful envy in Bobby's reaction to Alex's comment that she was Prom Queen?) There's the great visualizations of Robby's despair and Bobby's recognition of it by comparing Robby's work with Charlie Rasmussen's. (I love Charlie by the way, and the kid's interaction with his mother and the detectives. I think that kid is going to be all right.)

And there's one of the great guest actor performances in LOCI by the young Liam Aiken. Before the film's producers decided they had to cast an English actor, Mr. Aiken was apparently in the running for the role of Harry Potter. He has gone on to play Klaus in the film adaptation of the LEMONY SNICKETT novels, and was splendid in the role. I hope he continues acting and gets good roles. He has an intelligent, watchful quality that's very appealing. Without overdoing a plea for the audience's sympathy or attention, Mr. Aiken is absolutely heartbreaking as Robby, and his work with Mr. D'Onofrio is stunning. Watch how he warily and carefully watches his father. In his last scene with Mr. D'Onofrio, watch how Mr. Aiken plays with the baseball and tries alternately to hide and then release his notebook. I don't know who came up with those bits of business, but they are perfect, and Mr. Aiken performs beautifully.

For your consideration and comments.

Wardicus



#155 skittles4me

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Posted 06 December 2010 - 01:44 PM

BRIGHT BOY
Will air on USA on December 6 at 12pm(EST). Second episode of the second season. First aired October 6, 2002

Written by Marlane Gomard Meyer and Rene Balcer Directed by Frank Prinzi

Guest Actors:

Tim Guinee as David Bishop Tim Guinee also starred with Kathryn Erbe in the movie "Breathing Lessons" and short film "Mother's House"
Liam Aiken as Robby Bishop

Synopsis: The murders of a Deputy Mayor and a city social worker lead Goren and Eames to a bright boy and his ambitious father.

Quotes:

Eames: "I was so well adjusted they elected me Prom Queen." Goren: "I had to go to my counselor's office and have a talk with the school shrink.":P

Eames: "There can't be many places in town that give mortarboards to Baby Einsteins."

Eames: "You have to forgive my partner, Dr. Leonard. He's feeling very humble right now." Loved her early snarkiness!

Robby: "What's fun for me isn't always fun for my Dad."

Eames: "I can tell from the bull he was telling his wife." There it is again! (see above)

Dr. Leonard: "I hope you're not suggesting..." Goren: "We are."

Robby: "Baseball's the thinking man's game."

Deakins: "Dads kill over hockey. Why not education?"

David Bishop: "There's nothing I hate more than discussing my child with a know-it-all."

Goren: "Not realizing his Dad isn't like any forty-year-old."

Goren: "Worse thing for him? He'll miss Robby's college graduation."

Trivia--The Riemenn Hypothesis exists. It was first proposed by Bernhard Riemenn in 1859. It's been unsolved for over 150 years. The Clay Mathematics Institute offers a one million dollars prize for its solution.

This story may be based on the Justin Chapman case. Justin was considered a child genius, but it was revealed that his mother Elizabeth fabricated and manipulated test results. Justin was eventually removed from her custody and reportedly suffered psychological damage as a result of her actions.


Queries:

Does Robby's father care for his son at all, or only live for the reflected glory?David IS living vicariously thru his son (maye), but in the end shows he cares by confessing so Robby doesn't have to be a witness or know that his lie is responsible for Kim's death.
David Bishop has a history of not finishing things. Would he have finished Robby?I believe he would as long as he could manipulate him.

Who keeps their old report cards?
My mom keeps mine! LOL Of course she keeps EVERYTHING....
Does David really believe Robby is a genius?
I think he believes there is potential- with his help. I think the kid was pretty darn smart... what 10 year old knows the symbols for infinity, death and the end? (Besides Goren as a child! LOL)
What happened to Robby's mother? Was it an accident?
I tried to pay attention to this... did they actually say HOW she died? It was clear from Goren's face that he wondered how accidental the mom's death really was.
Would Robby have killed himself? Probably if no one recognized what was going on.

Will Robby survive? What will happen to him? The ending was optimistic. Hopefully he will live with his aunt, uncle and cousins and have a "normal" life and people who love him.

Why didn't the social worker pick up on how unhappy and troubled Robby was? Why didn't anyone?
*sigh* The adults in Robby's life had their own agendas and didn't consider HIS best interests. IDK why Kim didn't see it...maybe she was pressured by David and Dr. Leonard?
Does the victim get lost in this story?Agree with maye- there WERE two victims.
However, Kim DOES get lost. We really don't get to know much about her or meet her family.
Is Dr. Leonard also a villain in this story?
Yes. Receiving the prize money and recognition for "her" school took precedence over a child's health and well being.
Have Robby and his father moved a lot?
Yes, for a fresh start in a new place when they'd exhausted their possibilities where they were. BTW who keeps momentos of former hobbies prominently displayed in their living room?
Anyone uncomfortable with Goren manipulating a troubled little boy in an interrogation?
No, because he is sensitive and pushes only enough to get necessary information and reveal the truth. I think Robby was relieved in the end.
If a Deputy Mayor wasn't involved, would Major Case have been called? And if Goren and Eames weren't on the case, would David Bishop gotten away?No and yes. However, I thought the way the crime took place was strange. Wouldn't David know that killing 2 people would make for a higher profile case? Of course maybe he was thinking a double murder would disguise the motive....Hmmm.

Does Goren see himself in Robby? Or perhaps he sees Frank?
Oh I really see Robby as a little Bobby double (I'm big on looking for parallels :rolleyes: ) Even their names rhyme and are nicknames for 'Robert'. They both are of above intelligence and don't fit in with their peers. Both had single parent homes.

What is the Goren and Eames relationship like in this episode?
In the first season they are just learning about each other and share little personal tidbits about their past. I've always liked that they weren't BFF's from day one. It's fun to see them grow closer as time goes on. I believe that early on was about developing trust and a deep friendship. I am a shipper but I think that came about later. ;)

What is Carver's role? He plays the "heavy"... the one who pulls the strings and takes the lead once Goren and Eames give him enough evidence on which he can act. Sometimes (in other episodes) it seemed that G/E were constantly fighting with Carver, but they had great teamwork in this one!

Who's the Bright Boy? Just Robby, or possibly Goren and David Bishop? Robby and Bobby.

Comments: Oh, I like this episode, another where we visit over ambitious parents We get Bobby in sunglasses, Alex snark, Bobby and Alex acting as a great team, and that lovely exchange between Alex and Bobby that reveals a bit of what their high school lives were like. (Does anyone else see both surprise and a certain wistful envy in Bobby's reaction to Alex's comment that she was Prom Queen?) Yes, Alex had the high school experience on which Bobby feels he missed out. I think he probably felt awkward as a teen and didn't date a prom queen in high school; although after he gained some self confidence in his young adult years, I'm sure he dated whomever he wished! There's the great visualizations of Robby's despair and Bobby's recognition of it by comparing Robby's work with Charlie Rasmussen's. (I love Charlie by the way, and the kid's interaction with his mother and the detectives. I think that kid is going to be all right.) I loved Charlie too! He is probably playing in a rock band somewhere- much to his mom's dismay! LOL

And there's one of the great guest actor performances in LOCI by the young Liam Aiken. Before the film's producers decided they had to cast an English actor, Mr. Aiken was apparently in the running for the role of Harry Potter. He has gone on to play Klaus in the film adaptation of the LEMONY SNICKETT novels, and was splendid in the role. I hope he continues acting and gets good roles. He has an intelligent, watchful quality that's very appealing. Without overdoing a plea for the audience's sympathy or attention, Mr. Aiken is absolutely heartbreaking as Robby, and his work with Mr. D'Onofrio is stunning. Watch how he warily and carefully watches his father. In his last scene with Mr. D'Onofrio, watch how Mr. Aiken plays with the baseball and tries alternately to hide and then release his notebook. I don't know who came up with those bits of business, but they are perfect, and Mr. Aiken performs beautifully.Agree- the child actor was great!

For your consideration and comments.

Wardicus


Edited by skittles4me, 07 December 2010 - 09:14 AM.

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#156 Wardicus

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 09:54 AM

Will air December 11 at 1pm(EST) on WGN. Also 1am(EST) on Oxygen on December 10. Twenty-first episode of season 5. First aired May 14, 2006.

Directed by Frank Prinzi. Written by Diana Son and Rene Balcer.

Guest Actors:

Michael Rispoli as Frank Adair (the disgraced cop from MY GOOD NAME)
Josh Hamilton as Justin Reid
Theresa Russell as Regina Reid (Ms. Russell appeared in the short film HOTEL PARADISE (1995) opposite Mr. D’Onofrio. You can see a clip at http://www.thereelvi...lips/clips.html Look for the title of the film. The film features a young Mr. D’Onofrio wearing only a strategically placed sheet and snake.)
Adam Scarimbolo as Glynn Reid
Jeremy Webb as Charlie Taylor (Mr. Webb played the inmate “Chocolate Jimmy” in STRESS POSITION)

Synopsis: Goren and Eames investigate a series of church fires. Captain Deakins’ future with the NYPD becomes very uncertain.

Quotes:

Chief: “You know, Jimmy, everybody warned you Logan was a mutt. So don’t be surprised if you got fleas.”

Charlie: “I got a need for speed. Not that I break the law any more, officer. I got plenty enough tickets to last me a lifetime, but no DUIs. I don’t drink. I got an allergy.”

Goren: “Dangerous and fun.” Eames: “Woo-hoo.”

Goren: “Maybe he had trouble accepting her as his new mother. Maybe Regina seduced him to win him over.” Deakins: “She couldn’t just get him a new baseball mitt?”

Goren (to Deakins): “You don’t deserve this.”

Queries:

Should Deakins have fought? Was this departure worthy of the character and the actor? Did he at least receive better treatment than Goren/Eames (Mr. D’Onofrio/Ms. Erbe)?

Did Deakins abandon Goren and Eames?

Where is Deakins now? Where is Frank Adair?

Did Goren and Eames save Deakins’ soul?

Should Goren and Eames have fought harder for Deakins?

Is this the beginning of the end for Goren?

Does Bobby expect Deakins’ case to go badly? Is he more resigned than Alex?

Does Regina’s husband have any idea what’s going on? Does her stepson know his half brother is really his son?

Will any of these marriages survive? Any of the people?

Comments:

One of my pet ideas is that his association with Alex Eames and Bobby Goren saved James Deakins’ soul. I have a hard time thinking that the political animal we met in the early days of LOCI would’ve risked his career on a cop like Mike Logan or would’ve sacrificed it for the good of the NYPD’s public image. It’s wonderful to see Jamey Sheridan, who did terrific work in an often thankless job during his time on LOCI, to get a fine departure from the show with this episode and others.

I’d like to think Deakins found a good job as a consultant or in another part of law enforcement. I’d also like to think that he’ll eventually be vindicated. It’s probably too much to hope for, but I’d love to see the final episodes of LOCI reveal that Chief Moran was aligned with Frank Adair, for Moran to be shown as a corrupt bully, and perhaps for Deakins to return in some way.

There is, by the way, an actual case going on in this episode as well, one that I think is intriguing at least. I feel for poor, confused Justin, well played by Josh Hamilton. I loath Regina, also well played by Theresa Russell, who’s made something of a career playing these black widow types. And there’s the welcome return of Jeremy Webb, who’s played two of my favorite wild characters on LOCI.

Submitted, as always, for your comments and consideration.

Wardicus

#157 skittles4me

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 10:16 PM

Will air December 11 at 1pm(EST) on WGN. Also 1am(EST) on Oxygen on December 10. Twenty-first episode of season 5. First aired May 14, 2006.

Directed by Frank Prinzi. Written by Diana Son and Rene Balcer.

Guest Actors:

Michael Rispoli as Frank Adair (the disgraced cop from MY GOOD NAME)
Josh Hamilton as Justin Reid
Theresa Russell as Regina Reid (Ms. Russell appeared in the short film HOTEL PARADISE (1995) opposite Mr. D'Onofrio. You can see a clip at http://www.thereelvi...lips/clips.html Look for the title of the film. The film features a young Mr. D'Onofrio wearing only a strategically placed sheet and snake.)
Adam Scarimbolo as Glynn Reid
Jeremy Webb as Charlie Taylor (Mr. Webb played the inmate "Chocolate Jimmy" in STRESS POSITION)

Synopsis: Goren and Eames investigate a series of church fires. Captain Deakins' future with the NYPD becomes very uncertain.

Quotes:

Chief: "You know, Jimmy, everybody warned you Logan was a mutt. So don't be surprised if you got fleas."

Charlie: "I got a need for speed. Not that I break the law any more, officer. I got plenty enough tickets to last me a lifetime, but no DUIs. I don't drink. I got an allergy."

Goren: "Dangerous and fun." Eames: "Woo-hoo."

Goren: "Maybe he had trouble accepting her as his new mother. Maybe Regina seduced him to win him over." Deakins: "She couldn't just get him a new baseball mitt?"

Goren (to Deakins): "You don't deserve this."

Queries:

Should Deakins have fought? Was this departure worthy of the character and the actor? Did he at least receive better treatment than Goren/Eames (Mr. D'Onofrio/Ms. Erbe)? I think Frank Adair actually gave him a good reason to not fight (black eye on the NYPD, take down a secretary who was just following orders). Deakins, in his mind, took the high road. His departure never quite set right with me personally. He could have fought, but so could Goren and Eames in their (first :D ) ending.

Did Deakins abandon Goren and Eames? No, it wasn't about them. They are adults, things happen. Change is the only thing sure in life.

Where is Deakins now? Where is Frank Adair? I like to imagine that after Marie divorced Frank and got everything because he is serving life in prison, she asked Jimmy Deakins to take over Frank's successful security company.

Did Goren and Eames save Deakins' soul? I think Deakin's mellowed thru the years, but I always thought he was a good supportive guy.

Should Goren and Eames have fought harder for Deakins?
They did as much as they could and let it go with respect for Deakins' wishes.

Is this the beginning of the end for Goren? Wow. Yeah. Never thought of that before, but it IS! Deakins was supportive of Bobby- even when he didn't understand him. They had a mutual respect for each other. It took a long time for Bobby to get there with Ross. By then everything else was falling apart for Bobby...

Does Bobby expect Deakins' case to go badly? Is he more resigned than Alex?
This is one rare time when Alex goes "against the rules" like hacking into the boss's e-mails. She does take the lead on this one although I think Bobby is with her 100 percent.
Does Regina's husband have any idea what's going on? Does her stepson know his half brother is really his son? No, they were both clueless.

Will any of these marriages survive? Any of the people? I certainly don't think the marriages will survive. Won't Regina and Justin likely go to prison for a very long time to life? Hopefully Glynn and his "father" (grandfather) will be there for each other. It will be tough for Justin's wife, but she is young and the child is very young. Hopefully she will be able to move on.

Comments:

One of my pet ideas is that his association with Alex Eames and Bobby Goren saved James Deakins' soul. I have a hard time thinking that the political animal we met in the early days of LOCI would've risked his career on a cop like Mike Logan or would've sacrificed it for the good of the NYPD's public image. It's wonderful to see Jamey Sheridan, who did terrific work in an often thankless job during his time on LOCI, to get a fine departure from the show with this episode and others.

I'd like to think Deakins found a good job as a consultant or in another part of law enforcement. I'd also like to think that he'll eventually be vindicated. It's probably too much to hope for, but I'd love to see the final episodes of LOCI reveal that Chief Moran was aligned with Frank Adair, for Moran to be shown as a corrupt bully, and perhaps for Deakins to return in some way. I love this idea! I hope so too.

There is, by the way, an actual case going on in this episode as well, one that I think is intriguing at least. I feel for poor, confused Justin, well played by Josh Hamilton. I loath Regina, also well played by Theresa Russell, who's made something of a career playing these black widow types. And there's the welcome return of Jeremy Webb, who's played two of my favorite wild characters on LOCI. Charlie was so funny. I was so sad when he was killed.


Just a thought...LOCI is so subtle at times. One example is when Goren and Eames question Justin at his home and his wife is upstairs getting ready to go out. When G/E leave, Eames says something about the way he was hitting on her with his wife just upstairs. I had to rewind and pay close attention because I just didn't see that he was hitting on her the first time I watched it. He DOES kind of stare at her and smile and make a point of telling her how successful he is.
I love that this show doesn't just hit you over the head and spell things out. The subtle "non-verbal" cues are more open for interpretation and discussion IMO.


Submitted, as always, for your comments and consideration.

Wardicus


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#158 Wardicus

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Posted 14 December 2010 - 09:55 AM

Subtle. Subtle is one of the many things I love about LOCI.

Wardicus

#159 Wardicus

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Posted 16 December 2010 - 09:57 AM

PRAVDA

Will air at 10am (EST) on USA on December 20. First aired October 26, 2003. Fifth Episode of Season Three.

Written by Warren Leight and Rene Balcer. Directed by Alex Zakrzewski.

Guest Actors:

Anthony Mackie as Carl Hines
Glyn Turman as Roy Hines
Judd Hirsch as Ben Elkins
Michal Sinnott as Katya Jalenak
Recurring actor and role:
Samantha Buck as G. Lynn Bishop

Synopsis: The murder of a young photographer lead Bishop and Goren to a newspaper reporter with much to hide. The first Bishop episode.

Ripped from the headlines: Based on the Jayson Blair story. Blair was a young African-American working for the NEW YORK TIMES who was discovered making up and plagiarizing stories. See http://en.wikipedia....ki/Jayson_Blair

Quotes:

Detective (at the crime scene): “You two don’t take notes?” Bishop: “Uh…” Goren: “We haven’t worked that out yet.”

Goren (to Bishop after Eames reveals the cost of ATM withdrawals at strip clubs): “See what you miss not working Vice?”

Carver (to Goren): “You working for the defense now?”

Carver: “Mr. Elkins, do not play that card with me! Only a racist would turn this into a referendum on affirmative action.”

Bishop: “So you know, I did not enjoy that.” Goren: “No? Eames would have.”

Queries:

How well does this episode deal with race and racism?

Does Carl know his father killed Katya? If so, why does he protect him?

Does Carl realize he’s done anything wrong?

Why did Roy Hines kill Katya? Did he have to kill her?

Does Katya get lost in this story?

How did Bishop get to Major Case?

Does the Bishop/Goren relationship ever get better?

Who’s at fault for the problems in this relationship?

How does Carver feel about affirmative action?

Is Ben Elkins a racist?

Comments: A lot going on in this episode. Discussions of racism, affirmative action, and the introduction of G. Lynn Bishop. (Again, did we ever find out what that G. stood for?) I like the way this episode takes on some big issues without pounding the viewer over the head, and the fine performances of the regular and guest casts. But I’d also like to consider Bishop. I wonder if the character and the actress ever got a chance from the show’s fans. At the same time, Bishop often seems woefully unprepared for the rigors of Major Case. She doesn’t appear to have studied the squad and particularly not to have studied Robert Goren. I wonder if her temporary appointment was a political favor on the behalf of Captain Deakins.

Submitted, as always, for your consideration and comments.

Wardicus

#160 skittles4me

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Posted 18 December 2010 - 03:41 PM

PRAVDA

Will air at 10am (EST) on USA on December 20. First aired October 26, 2003. Fifth Episode of Season Three.

Written by Warren Leight and Rene Balcer. Directed by Alex Zakrzewski.

Guest Actors:

Anthony Mackie as Carl Hines
Glyn Turman as Roy Hines
Judd Hirsch as Ben Elkins
Michal Sinnott as Katya Jalenak
Recurring actor and role:
Samantha Buck as G. Lynn Bishop

Synopsis: The murder of a young photographer lead Bishop and Goren to a newspaper reporter with much to hide. The first Bishop episode.

Ripped from the headlines: Based on the Jayson Blair story. Blair was a young African-American working for the NEW YORK TIMES who was discovered making up and plagiarizing stories. See http://en.wikipedia....ki/Jayson_Blair

Quotes:

Detective (at the crime scene): "You two don't take notes?" Bishop: "Uh…" Goren: "We haven't worked that out yet." Does Eames take notes?

Goren (to Bishop after Eames reveals the cost of ATM withdrawals at strip clubs): "See what you miss not working Vice?"
He smiles like he is so proud of Eames in this scene!
Carver (to Goren): "You working for the defense now?"

Carver: "Mr. Elkins, do not play that card with me! Only a racist would turn this into a referendum on affirmative action."

Bishop: "So you know, I did not enjoy that." Goren: "No? Eames would have." I love this! (I have to admit that I feel a little bit sorry for Bishop. No one, in Goren's eyes, can hold a candle to Eames).

Queries:

How well does this episode deal with race and racism?

Does Carl know his father killed Katya? If so, why does he protect him?

Does Carl realize he's done anything wrong?

Why did Roy Hines kill Katya? Did he have to kill her? I question this. It makes the story more unrealistic IMO.

Does Katya get lost in this story?

How did Bishop get to Major Case?

Does the Bishop/Goren relationship ever get better?

Who's at fault for the problems in this relationship? Both. Goren shouldn't give her the little "No one is as good as Eames" digs, but Bishop is so rigid. Maybe she feels that she has to be uptight to be taken seriously, but a little sense of humor never hurt anyone.

How does Carver feel about affirmative action?

Is Ben Elkins a racist?

Comments: A lot going on in this episode. Discussions of racism, affirmative action, and the introduction of G. Lynn Bishop. (Again, did we ever find out what that G. stood for?) I like the way this episode takes on some big issues without pounding the viewer over the head, and the fine performances of the regular and guest casts. But I'd also like to consider Bishop. I wonder if the character and the actress ever got a chance from the show's fans. At the same time, Bishop often seems woefully unprepared for the rigors of Major Case. She doesn't appear to have studied the squad and particularly not to have studied Robert Goren. I wonder if her temporary appointment was a political favor on the behalf of Captain Deakins.

Submitted, as always, for your consideration and comments.

Wardicus


It has been a long time since I have seen this episode and am undecided whether I'll watch it on marathon Monday. I find the idea of Roy plotting to kill his own son very disturbing. I also find his reason for killing Katya (he was surprised?) to be weak.
To be honest, I just don't like the Bishop/Goren episodes. I don't know if I am biased because I love Goren and Eames together so much, or if it is her. I think the writers intentionally created a mismatch for Goren so the audience would miss Eames and to reinforce our appreciation of the Goren/Eames dynamic.

As far as the big issues are concerned, I understand how Roy would be very disappointed in his son. I don't remember Carver's stance in this episode, but he doesn't shy away from letting his opinions be known. (Remember his pro-life attitude in "The Third Horseman"?)


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